Archive on 4: Houses v Fields documentary

I happened across this interesting Radio 4 programme yesterday about England’s attachment to our countryside as “a guiding idea and inspiration”. The programme talks about how England’s natural landscape provided an “idea of England to be fought for” during the world wars, and explores the tensions created between preserving the English landscape and needing to expand and provide land for new homes and industries as the twentieth century progressed, taking in inter-war ribbon development, the rise of owner-occupation, prefab construction after the Second World War, New Towns on greenfield sites, satellite towns, affordable housing, the profession of planning, the rise of the car, etc. .

The programme uses interviews and archive clips, from John Betjeman on ‘Metroland’ and a clip from radio producer Olive Shapley’s 1930s Manchester slum conditions documentary the Classic Soil, to Winston Churchill on the delights of indoor bathrooms.

Find the programme on iPlayer here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01j2bzr/Archive_on_4_Houses_v_Fields/ 

I found the programme’s discussion of an idealised version of a ‘deep’ or ‘lost’ England interesting in relation to my reading about modernity – as other writers have observed, modernity in Britain can be seen as clinging onto tradition and preservation, refusing to completely break with the past in its vision of the future (see Conekin, Mort and Waters 1999, Matless 2001). It is also going to be interesting to see what kind of visions of Britain were presented to children in the artworks included in Pictures for Schools, particularly in the paintings, many of which take the English landscape as their inspiration.  

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