Reflections on Pictures for Schools research seminar

Pictures for Schools Research seminar coverLast night I did my first talk about my research, for a research seminar in my school, the Grenfell-Baines School of Architecture, Construction and Design at the University of Central Lancashire. Due to the diverse nature of the department – although I am in a sub-department of geography, a lot of the research is based around earthworms and ecology – I had to tailor my talk to people who might not have much knowledge of art and design. This made me really think about how to present my work into Pictures for Schools clearly and logically, and which bits I needed to focus on in order to tell the story of the scheme and why I am looking at it. This proved to be a useful exercise, which made me really think about what to leave out as much as what to include.

I decided to start with a broad overview of Pictures for Schools and its founder Nan Youngman (using the 1967 and 1969 catalogues I was given at the start of my project as a visual aid), covering what the scheme was and the types of artworks which were included, before setting out my research context. I decided to go about this by unpacking the title of my research project, Pictures for Schools: Art, Education and Reconstruction in Post-War Britain, starting by setting the context of the post-war period and working my way outwards by explaining the interlinked developments which took place at the time around art, education, reconstruction and citizenship, before discussing some of the current work which has been done in these areas in the fields of art history, geography and educational history and how my project can add to this.

I then shared some of the empirical research I have been doing over the first year of the project, discussing finds from archival visits, what I learned during my visit to the county collection in Derbyshire and oral history interviews, before talking about how my research and reevaluation of Pictures for Schools could be made relevant to art and education today.

I was pleased to get some interesting questions and comments from the audience, including comments about a tendency to display children’s artworks in schools instead of artists’ artworks, possible links with higher education and displaying artworks in university campuses such as the University of Sussex, the fact that most of the exhibitions were in the south of England, and issues around one group of society imposing their taste on another.

There were also a few questions which made me realise I could have explained some aspects of Pictures for Schools better, around how big the sculptures were, whether schools bought directly from the exhibitions as well as local authorities, whether there were any themes to the exhibitions, how work was chosen if too much was submitted and how the artworks were used in schools – were they just put in corridors? Another interesting question related to the title of the scheme itself, and whether it made Pictures for Schools sound narrower (focusing just on pictures) than it was (the title of the exhibition is not representative of other elements of the exhibitions such as embroidery and sculpture).

Comments and questions also made me realise just how much I need to try and find people who visited the exhibitions as children, perhaps through a call-out in a national art magazine or perhaps by advertising more locally in areas that showed a particular interest in the scheme, as one person suggested.

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2 Comments on “Reflections on Pictures for Schools research seminar”

  1. […] of research differ considerably from mine, both had attended my in-school Pictures for Schools research seminar in January 2014 so had some understanding of the project. They admitted this background knowledge […]

  2. […] I talked about my PhD project at an internal research seminar for my school at UCLan (the Grenfell-Baines School of Architecture, Construction and Environment) […]


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