Exhibition visit: ‘Elisabeth Frink: The Presence of Sculpture’, Nottingham Lakeside Arts

12747398_1754251194796392_4287106086323443259_oI was delighted to stumble across an exhibition of sculptures by Elisabeth Frink during a daytrip to Nottingham at the weekend, at the university’s Lakeside gallery. Frink was one of the best-known British artists to be involved in the Pictures for Schools exhibitions, and served on selection committees to select sculptures for the exhibitions for a number of years. She also submitted sculptures to Pictures for Schools, and sold works on paper through the scheme, including drawings from her Spinning Man series.

1899760_1754251118129733_6850419545249478624_oEntitled ‘The Presence of Sculpture’, the Nottingham show focused largely on Frink’s post-war commissions and drew attention to themes and subject matter, from heads (many displaying a smooth serenity), horses and birds to movement, change, uncertainty and the lightness and heaviness of flight. Works and studies on display included large-scale sculptures for corporate companies such as WH Smith, and work in the Battersea outdoor sculpture exhibition, as well as religious and public commissions, including her angular, roughly textured eagle lectern for Coventry cathedral and her controversial tribute at Manchester airport to Alcock and Brown’s non-stop Atlantic flight, which somehow manages to retain a sense of grace despite the flailing, tapering descent of the legs and the contrast between the smoothness of the man-made wings and the awkwardness of the human body. Much was made of the ways in which her artworks were encountered in people’s everyday lives.

10688127_1754251131463065_3655730160085344987_oHowever, my favourite works were those depicting boars, including a spindly-tailed bronze in which the bulk of the animal has been arrested in movement, seemingly coming to a sudden stop. I also loved the washed-out colour and hairy detail of the 1967 lithograph ‘Wild Boar’.

‘The Presence of Sculpture’ finishes on Sunday February 28.

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2 Comments on “Exhibition visit: ‘Elisabeth Frink: The Presence of Sculpture’, Nottingham Lakeside Arts”

  1. […] and continues to work and take an interest in the collection today, the sculptor and print-maker Elisabeth Frink, along with Sandra Blow and Michael […]

  2. […] steers away from storytelling to depict emotion and expression. Among the most powerful works are Elizabeth Frink’s 1956 drawing Pieta, which presents a face full of knowledge in her signature big-nosed style, […]


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