Carel Weight’s paintings and the Folkestone art collection

Growing up near Folkestone, I loved visiting the Metropole Art Gallery, situated in a huge, horseshoe-shaped late-Victorian pile with parquet floors, polished fireplaces and large windows overlooking the English Channel. Situated on Folkestone’s cliff-top Leas promenade, and bordered by lawns and a sweeping driveway, I thought it was incredibly glamorous – this was the only area of the town where you could imagine the rich and interesting may once have stayed, partied and relaxed in the town’s heyday as a Victorian and Edwardian resort.

The Metropole regularly hosted exhibitions of emerging and established artists, from the visceral paintings of Derek Jarman to the inventive and eclectic experiments of local Foundation degree students. I was sad, therefore, that it closed in 2008, with the town’s Creative Foundation focusing instead on the new Folkestone Triennial, held for the first time that year. Although the Triennial places new commissions across the town every three years, with a small number being retained as permanent exhibits, the town now lacks a major contemporary art gallery bringing changing exhibitions to the town.

Whilst I’d always known that the politician and diarist Alan Clark lived in the secluded Saltwood Castle, just up the hill from my hometown of Hythe, it was only later that I learned more about his father, the art critic and broadcaster Kenneth Clark.

Clark supported the establishment of the New Metropole Art Centre in the 1960s, and the development of a town collection of modern art in the 1960s and 1970s. This collection contains a lot of names familiar from the Pictures for Schools exhibitions – the Surrealist print-makers Michael Rothenstein and Julian Trevelyan, the Kitchen Sink painter John Bratby, the print-makers Gertrude Hermes, Valerie Thornton and Anthony Gross, Kent-based painter Fred Cuming, who was featured in Pictures for Schools as a young artist and continues to work and take an interest in the collection today, and the sculptor and print-maker Elisabeth Frink, along with Sandra Blow and Michael Stokoe.

Among the most notable is the Royal Academician Carel Weight, who was a friend of Pictures for Schools founder Nan Youngman and helped organise and select work for the exhibitions. Like Youngman, Weight was active in the Artists International Association. As well as being professor of painting at the Royal College of Art in London, Weight periodically taught at the Adult Education Centre at the Metropole.

When the Metropole closed, it looked likely that Folkestone’s collection of modern art – which had been placed in Kent County Council storage – would be sold too, but fortunately it’s been retained by a Trust. Several paintings by Weight are now on display across the road at another huge Victorian complex – the Grand (a network of tunnels, predating both the Metropole and the Grand, linked the two buildings, and apparently treasures from the British Museum were stored for safekeeping in a tunnel underneath the Grand during the Second World War).

The Grand, with its shabby-eccentric chic, has certainly seen better days, declining in the second half of the twentieth century as Folkestone lost its status as a holiday destination for the royal and well-connected. Today, five of Weight’s works hang in the drawing room, a formal room just off the main reception and palm court restaurant with neoclassical columns, chandeliers and William Morris block-printed wallpaper featuring green-tinged birds.

Much of Weight’s work which I have seen has, like many of the artworks exhibited in Pictures for Schools, depicted very everyday places and activities, such as the small-scale excitement of a village football match. At the Grand two green-dominated country scenes, ‘Young Lovers’ and ‘Old Lovers’, offer an intimate and almost intrusive glimpse of two unassuming, guarded figures and convey the vicissitudes and tensions of a relationship at different stages of its development. ‘Portrait of a Poet’, which apparently depicts the artist in his studio, foregrounds a serious man in an overcoat. In the background are stacked paintings offering a glance of the backs of yellow-brick Georgian townhouses, viewed from their gardens.

The most interesting picture, however, is the large ‘Battersea Park Tragedy’, painted in the 1970s, split between a dark and dusky scene and a large, brushed sky sunset. Whilst at first sight portraying the mundane – the skeletal outlines of winter trees, the high fence of a tennis court, a small passageway overhung with trees and the excitement/fear-inducing twists of a deserted rollercoaster in the background – the painting introduces an element of the mystical. In one corner, an angel rises above a figure with a bowed head, blank face and clasped hands: the painting is named after the Battersea funfair disaster of 1972, in which children were killed in a fairground accident.

A small, tucked away room in a vast hotel might not be the most prominent place for these paintings, but at least they are still in a semi-public, accessible place. The paintings, created over forty years ago, and not particularly artistically adventurous or striking in their quiet realism, nevertheless form a thoughtful response, observation and reflection on then-contemporary events, public and private, as well as a document of artistic patronage and collecting at the time.

For more information about the Folkestone art collection, and to see details of upcoming exhibitions, visit http://folkestonearttrust.org.uk.


Action Space film

I enjoyed the new film by Manchester-based film-maker Huw Wahl, who directed the Herbert Read documentary To Hell With Culture a couple of years ago. Huw’s new documentary focuses on Action Space, an ‘instant performance space’ developed in the 1960s by his father, Ken Turner. The Action Space collective created inflatable, movable, interactive sculptures which could be put ‘up and down in a flash’, taking art onto the streets and providing an immersive environment and experience for children and adults that incorporated music and performance. Almost fifty years on, the experimental spirit and ethos of Action Space still shines through, with Turner still committed to the transformative potential of art and its ability to affect social change.

For more information and dates of screenings, visit www.hctwahl.com/as/index.html.


Interesting Radio 4 documentary: Pevsner: Through Outsider’s Eyes

When I first read Nikolaus Pevsner’s The Englishness of English Art I was really interested in his notion that Englishness could be defined as a set of characteristics, strongly related to climate, that affected the way the nation expressed itself in its art – as seen through the eyes of an incomer, a German.

An interesting radio documentary, recently broadcast on Radio 4 in the context of Britain’s recent ‘Brexit’ vote, revisits the Englishness seen through Pevsner’s eyes as an outsider, focusing on his work of the 1940s, when ideas of Britishness and Englishness faced another major crisis – war.

Pevsner, the programme explains, took a series of field trips around the highways and byways of England, perambulating around towns and villages in order to produce a pocket guide to the nation’s architecture and places in a style that could be carried around by schoolboys in their anoraks as a way of teaching them how to look and see. The programme points out that although Pevsner had very clear ideas of what was right and wrong, he considered it important to write about everywhere, however ordinary it may have seemed.

The programme features some insightful cameos, from Jonathan Meades to geographer David Matless and, at a time when questions of a common or shared national identity seem further away than ever, it evokes some interesting debates. Listen online at www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07h2v3y.