Exhibition visit: ‘Radical Clay’, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery

This week I visited Bristol to catch ‘Radical Clay’, a small but thoughtfully done exhibition showcasing some of the ceramic pieces which were acquired as educational resources for the city’s schools. The exhibition posed the question: ‘Is investing in children’s creativity by showing them the very best still something to aspire to?’

Now mostly accessioned into the Bristol Art Gallery collection, more than 400 examples of studio pottery were purchased to be lent to schools across Bristol in the post-war period. Pictures for Schools was one of the places from which Bristol, along with a small number of other local education authorities and museum services, bought pottery, as well as purchasing work directly from galleries such as Primavera in London.

Bristol developed an impressive collection containing work by some of the leading potters of the time, including Bernard and Janet Leach, Hans Coper, Lucy Rie, Helen Pincombe and Peter O’Malley, as well as potters with more local connections, including to the local art schools. Pieces ranged from abstract sculptural objects, such as a stoneware vase by Hans Coper (1970), to more functional items such as bowls, teapots, cups and vases, to crafted object such as an earthenware dove by Ewart Uncles (1969).

Whilst some were chosen to appeal to children, incorporating imagery such as fish, cockerels and birds, the exhibition usefully drew out some of the other ways in which the pieces might have been used in schools, such as demonstrating particular techniques, ways of forming shapes, and of creating decorative patterns.

The pieces were lent to schools until 1990 when the service, consisting of increasingly valuable and hard-to-insure artworks, closed. However, ‘Radical Clay’ gave some idea of how the artworks might have been used in schools, reproducing photographs of ceramic pieces displayed in school alongside students’ own work, alongside testimonies from those who had studied and taught in Bristol’s post-war schools about the influence that creative education had had on their future careers.

As well as placing the collection within the post-war educational context of Britain’s post-war schools, as a tool for fostering first-hand learning and the development of creativity, the exhibition explored wider trends in studio pottery at that time, partly through the use of archival documentary films demonstrating particular schools, studios/production contexts and techniques. The exhibition drew connections not just to a fashion for Mediterranean dining, and to artists’ and craftspeople’s ambitions that their work should be affordable and enjoyed as part of everyday life, but to countercultural movements which reacted against mass culture and consumerism and placed renewed value on the handmade at that time.

‘Radical Clay’ is at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery until Sunday 10 June. For more information visit www.bristolmuseums.org.uk/bristol-museum-and-art-gallery/whats-on/radical-clay.

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Exhibition of Argyll County Council’s school art collection

I’ve received an email about an upcoming exhibition of work by Scottish artists from Argyll County Council’s art collection for schools, dating from the 1960s to the 1980s, organised by Cowal Open Studios.

The exhibition Paintings are for People — the Argyll Art Collection takes place at Dunoon Burgh Hall from 21 April-2 June and Tighnabruaich Gallery from 28 April-3 June.


Symposium paper: Pictures for schools: Marion Adnams and educational art collections

I’m looking forward to speaking at the Marion Adnams Symposium, which takes place at the University of Derby on Wednesday 7 March, 1pm-6pm. The abstract for my paper is below. To book onto the symposium, which is free, visit www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/marion-adnams-symposium-tickets-42085404578?.

Pictures for schools: Marion Adnams and educational art collections

Like many female artists of her generation, Marion Adnams worked as an educationalist alongside her artistic practice, teaching in girls’ schools and at a teacher training college. This was a time when educationalists such as Marion Richardson, Evelyn Gibbs and Nan Youngman worked to accord art a more significant place in the life of schools.

One element of this new form of art education was a desire to expose children to original works of art by professional, contemporary artists in their schools. Between 1947 and 1969 this was put into practice by Nan Youngman through the Pictures for Schools programme, which took the form of annual exhibitions in London of work sold at prices affordable to educational buyers. Paintings, textiles, drawings and sculpture were sold to schools, teacher training colleges, local authority loan collections and museum services all over the country.

Adnams’ work is represented in several educational collections, including the Leicestershire county collection art collection and the Rutherston Loan Scheme at Manchester Art Gallery, as well as the Derbyshire Museum Service, one of the most well-established and enthusiastic patrons of Pictures for Schools, where three of her paintings are still available for schools to borrow today.

This paper will explore the development of such collections, and their educational aims and use. It will highlight the place of original works of art as part of a changing conception of art education that aimed to encourage children’s capacities for self-expression, appreciation and critique, as much as the development of technical ability.


Viva survivor

I’m really pleased to announce that I passed my viva on Friday, at the University of Central Lancashire.

I was examined by Dr Sarah Mills from the University of Loughborough, who has done a lot of work about the history of twentieth century British youth movements in relationship to informal education and citizenship, and Dr Keith Vernon from UCLan, whose work I had come across in the context of adult education and the co-operative movement.

I talked them through my research and methodologies, at the same time as giving them more detail about how the scheme worked in practice, including the voluntary involvement of the artists involved and the ways in which the artists chose the pictures that they submitted to be exhibited. They asked me some interesting questions about the ways in which I framed my research – including the extent to which the ideas which informed Pictures for Schools were new ideas, or the extent to which they were older ideas that found a receptive environment for implementation in the post-war period; the extent to which the recent interest in post-war Britain is informed by nostalgia; and critical reactions to Pictures for Schools, and the extent to which I maintained a critical distance from Nan Youngman, despite my admiration of her as the founder of the scheme.

I spoke to several former PhD students before my viva, and the best bit of advice I was given was to try to enjoy my viva, and to bear in mind that it was a one-off opportunity to discuss my work in-depth with people who had read it more thoroughly than it is likely to be read by anyone else. I certainly felt really encouraged by my examiners’ interest in and enthusiasm for Pictures for Schools.


Interesting journal article about Alec Clegg

Following on from my last article, about the School Prints at the Hepworth Gallery in Wakefield and their place in the history of the provision of artworks in schools in the West Riding of Yorkshire, I came across this interesting article by Cathy Burke in the History of Education journal about Alec Clegg, and the way in which his ideas of progressive education were shared among educators internationally.

To read visit http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/vb7bXMd6GsTqz7JBvDpk/full.


Exhibition visit: ‘School Prints’, Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield

I recently visited a small exhibition at the Hepworth Gallery in Wakefield about the School Prints, which emerged at a similar time to Pictures for Schools. The School Prints commissioned work by many of the artists who sold work at Pictures for Schools, including Julian Trevelyan, Kenneth Rowntree, Michael Rothenstein and LS Lowry, and several of those involved in Pictures for Schools, including Nan Youngman, Herbert Read and Audrey Martin, were on its advisory panel. Ultimately, however, Pictures for Schools, and supporters such as Henry Morris, Director of Education in Cambridgeshire, reacted against the School Prints, believing that it did not go far enough, and that ‘original’ artworks such as paintings, sculptures and textiles were of more value to schools.

Some of the prints on display at the Hepworth had been accessioned from the West Yorkshire education service, although there was no mention in the exhibition of the fact that the West Riding, under Director of Education Alec Clegg, had once been regarded as one of the leading local education authorities for the provision of artworks to schools, and had created one of the country’s largest county loan collections. However, these efforts to provide artworks to local schools clearly still played some part in the cultural memory of the area. During my visit, a woman turned to the woman she was with and reminisced about attending a brand new school which had opened in 1952, and had a large, bright work of art on the wall which, she speculated, ‘must have had something to do with this’.

I was pleased to see quotes from students from a local secondary school, who had been trained as ‘art ambassadors’, on display alongside the artworks. My favourite comes from 13-year-old Alison Alute, who said: “All the different things going on in this painting makes a little voice in my head scream with excitement!”

I have reviewed the School Prints exhibition for Corridor8 at http://corridor8.co.uk/article/school-prints.


Consultations on the future of art loan services in Derbyshire and Hertfordshire

I was dismayed to hear last week that two of the (very few) remaining local authority art loan collections for schools, in Hertfordshire and Derbyshire, are currently consulting on their future and are at risk of closure.

Both are significant collections of twentieth century art, encompassing paintings, prints, sculptures, textiles and ceramics, with a particular strength in post-war British art. Both collections are also closely linked to significant figures in the history of British education, who took a keen interest in their development and use as part of an education and educational environment in which art was valued not just in its own right, but for its potential to enrich the child culturally, socially and emotionally.

Both LEAs purchased work from Pictures for Schools and supported the scheme in other ways, such as assisting with the selection of the artworks; in the post-war period, both Hertfordshire and Derbyshire were regarded as running flagship museum services for other local education authorities to emulate. Both collections have continued to actively acquire new work from contemporary artists.

Hertfordshire’s collection was established alongside an extensive and highly regarded school building programme which took place after the Second World War, which used innovative building techniques and saw artworks bought and commissioned for new school buildings. Director of Education Sir John Newsom, author of the 1963 Newsom Report, was an influential figure in post-war educational reform, who advocated for the importance of the arts in schools as part of a rounded education. Pictures for Schools founder Nan Youngman turned down a job as Newsom’s art adviser in order to work for Henry Morris in Cambridgeshire; this position was held instead by artists Audrey Martin and Mary Hoad, both of whom were active in the Society for Education through Art and interested in new ideas about art education (Hoad was also Principal of St Albans School of Art). For more about the history of the collection see www.hertsmemories.org.uk/content/herts-history/topics/art-and-artists/hertfordshires-county-art-collection/the-hertfordshire-county-art-collection.

Derbyshire’s collection dates back to a Carnegie Trust grant in the 1930s, yet reached its heyday in the post-war period under another progressive Director of Education, Jack Longland, who had been Newsom’s deputy in Hertfordshire and was inspired by Henry Morris’ village colleges model, and Museum Service Organiser Barbara Winstanley. Both Longland and Winstanley took an active interest in Pictures for Schools, by serving on organising, planning and selection committees, and giving feedback and other support to the scheme.

Sadly, it appears that the collections have fallen victim to the challenges that have faced such services in other locations. These include a squeeze on school finances, pressures on council budgets, and the rising values and associated insurance costs of many of the artworks, coupled with a lack of specialist understanding and staff resources to enable schools to make optimal use of these artworks.

For more information about the potential sale of the Hertfordshire collection, much of which has been in storage for several years, visit www.hertfordshiremercury.co.uk/news/hertfordshire-news/council-dispose-of-over-1600-1106692.

The consultation about the ‘disposal’ of Hertfordshire’s work is being done in stages; the first round of the consultation shuts on Sunday 4 February. The council proposes selling those artworks which are not considered to have ‘relevance’ to Hertfordshire. For more information, and to add your views, visit www.hertfordshire.gov.uk/about-the-council/consultations/property/art-collection-consultation.aspx#.

A petition against the sale of the collection is currently circulating, which can be signed at www.change.org/p/save-hertfordshire-s-public-art-collection.

The Derbyshire consultation closes on Sunday 11 February.