This Land Is Our Land: article about landscape and protest in the Fourdrinier

The new issue of the Fourdrinier is out today and focuses on This Land Is Our Land at Paper Gallery in Manchester (open Saturdays 11-5 until 3 August), a new group exhibition inspired by Marion Shoard’s classic book of the same name and the Kinder trespass. I’ve written an essay around some of the themes explored in the show, such as access to the countryside, and the ways in which our experiences of the countryside are mediated physically and culturally, drawing partly on some of the reading around landscapes I did during my PhD.

Read online: www.thefourdrinier.com/physical-land-visual-landscapes

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Paper at History of Education conference

I’m looking forward to presenting at the History of Education annual conference in Limerick, Ireland, next week, which is themed ‘Revolution, Remembrance and Re-vision: Charting the Path of Education’. My paper will be part of the session ‘Education and periods of social, political, civil and cultural unrest’, on Saturday 10 November. My abstract is as follows:

Education through Art: Nan Youngman and Pictures for Schools

Between 1947 and 1969, Pictures for Schools aimed to embed art in Britain’s schools by selling affordably priced artworks at annual exhibitions. Although it emerged at the same time as state-sponsored patronage schemes, Pictures for Schools operated both within and outside of this context. Despite benefiting from a receptive educational and funding climate, it was initiated and driven by the personal, artistic and political convictions of the artist and educationalist Nan Youngman (1906-1995).

Youngman studied at the Slade in the 1920s before training as a teacher. She taught in girls’ schools and worked as Art Adviser to Henry Morris in Cambridgeshire for ten years, alongside running evening and residential classes for painters and teachers. She remained active in education until the end of her life, at the same time as continuing to paint, exhibit and sell work. These two aspects of her life and work sat alongside one another, and both influenced the shape and direction of Pictures for Schools.

Paying attention to Nan Youngman’s life and career through biographical research, drawn from archival collections relating to both her educational and artistic work, enables a history of Pictures for Schools to be told that is individual rather than institutional. It also shows how Youngman’s personal beliefs and actions intersected with wider cultural, social and political shifts in attitudes and educational priorities. Furthermore, it places post-war developments in art education in a longer lineage that was deeply rooted in the experiences of those working in art and education in the interwar years.

For more information visit www.hesc.mic.ul.ie.


Pictures for Schools: educating the aesthetic citizen 1947-1969 (paper at the New and Emerging postgraduate research in historical geography session, RGS-IBG conference)

I have recently been accepted to do a 15-minute paper in the New and Emerging postgraduate research in historical geography session, sponsored by the Historical Geography Research Group, at the RGS-IBG summer conference in London at the end of August. Abstract below.

Pictures for Schools: educating the aesthetic citizen 1947-1969

This paper will show how Pictures for Schools, a scheme which has been the subject of little previous research, aimed to develop the so-called ‘aesthetic citizen’ and emphasised the part that making aesthetically-informed choices could play in the development of a new ‘design for life’ for modern, post-war Britain.

The inter- and post-war years saw an increased emphasis on developing British citizens’ awareness of their power to improve their own environments. Matless (1996) has identified a form of ‘aesthetic citizenship’, prioritising visual education and aesthetic appreciation, which, whilst partly linked to enjoyment, tied into ideas about the responsibilities of the citizen, their role in the reconstruction process and the creation of a future vision of Britain.

Part of the nation’s visual education was the move to make art and design more accessible to the population in the post-war period. One scheme for widening access to original works of art was Pictures for Schools, an annual series of exhibitions of artworks by British artists which took place between 1947 and 1969. Pictures for Schools was aimed explicitly at developing the visual skills and discernment of the next generation of citizens, targeting works for sale to schools and local education authorities and highlighting the individual and social benefits of exposure to original works of art as children grew up.

In this paper I explore how the organisers of Pictures for Schools emphasised the importance of environment on children’s education, prioritising modes of education which encouraged children develop their skills of looking, seeing and describing what was around them; skills they could then take forward into their adult lives as citizens capable of making effective taste judgments and actively shaping their environments.